Tag Archives: Black Education

I Sincerely Hope the Louisville NAACP is not Intentionally Misleading African Americans about Charter Schools

I read this morning that during a forum last week the president of the Louisville chapter of the NAACP made the statement that charter schools are private schools that cherry pick their students. First, search I hope what I read was a mistake. If, buy cialis however, it was not a mistake, I hope it was an honest mistake on the part of the president and not an intentional attempt to mislead Louisville’s African American community about charter schools.

Charter schools are not private schools. All charter schools are public schools. Under the charter school legislation that has been proposed in Kentucky, charter schools would be funded in the same way that every other public school in Kentucky is funded; receiving state and local dollars based on the number of students that attend schools. Further, under the proposed legislation in Kentucky, students would be admitted to charter schools through a simple admissions process; there would be no admissions preferences. Students who apply would be admitted, and if there are more applicants than seats, admission would be determined through a lottery. The proposed charter school legislation in Kentucky would actually make charter schools much less selective than the current magnet programs in operation in Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS).

Again, I hope the Louisville NAACP president’s comments were an honest mistake and not an intentional attempt to mislead Louisvillians. With the achievement of African American students in Jefferson County where it is, we don’t have time for politics and gamesmanship. If we’re going to debate the most appropriate ways for improving education for children in Louisville and across Kentucky, let’s do it honestly.

Parents want as many high quality school options available to them as possible, period. Strong public charter school legislation is one way to increase the number of high quality options available to parents.

ACT Scores Show Black Students in Kentucky are in Serious Trouble

Last week the ACT Scores for Kentucky’s high school class of 2012 were released. The results show that while their composite average has increased slightly from a 19.2 for last year’s class to a 19.5 for this year’s class, no rx Kentucky seniors’ scores still lag behind the national average composite score of 21.1. But possibly of even greater concern for this audience is that the gap between White and Black students in Kentucky has increased.

Average scores for White children in Kentucky have increased from from 22.1 in 2008 to 22.4 in 2012. Average scores for Asian students have risen from 22.9 to 23.6. Average scores for Hispanic students have risen from 18.7 to 18.9. The average scores for Black children in Kentucky since 2008 have been substantially lower than any other group of students. Black students in 2008 had an average composite score of 16.9, check and in the last four years has increased by only one tenth of a point to 17.0  That means the gap between White and Black students’ scores has increased from 5.2 points in 2008 to 5.4 points in 2012.

 To put those numbers into perspective for you, buy  that means in Kentucky’s class of 2012 only 5% of Black students have met ACT college-readiness standards in all four subject areas. That is compared to 42% of Asian students, 32% of White students, and 13% of Hispanic students who met ACT college-readiness standards in all four subject areas. To be clear, none of those percentages are particularly good, but the fact that such a small percentage of Black students have met college-readiness standards in Kentucky in 2012 is pretty scary to me. 

Students and parents should understand that many of the jobs that existed in previous generations do not and will not exist in the US for today’s students. The impact of globalization and technology have greatly changed the opportunities that will be available for students. Understanding that, it troubles me how often I still hear adults debating whether or not children need to on to college to lead productive lives. I may upset some folks here but I don’t care. The truth is that if students do not go on to pursue some type of post-secondary education, either earning a degree in a field where they will be able to get a job paying a living wage, or going on to a community or technical college to learn a skill or trade, they will be left on the outside looking in on the 21st Century US economy. If anyone tells you anything different, they are either uninformed about these changes or they are choosing to mislead you. Previous generations of students may not have gone to college and everything may have worked out just fine for them, but the American economy has changed.

The just of all this is simple; unless we can make some pretty significant changes in a lot of areas quickly, Black children in Kentucky are going to be in a whole lot of trouble.

Remember, change begins with you. Be empowered my friends!