BMI-S 11.16.10

Educational Attainment for Black & Latino Males Remains Alarmingly Low

The Schott Foundation’s 2012 report, case The Urgency of Now, shows that high school graduation rates for Black male students remain significantly lower than for any other group of students. Since 2004 the foundation’s reports have shown that Black male students are significantly less likely than any other group of students to earn a high school diploma. This year’s report shows that only 52% of Black males and 58% of Latino males graduate from high school in four years, compared to 78% of White, non-Latino males who graduate high school in four years.

These numbers show clearly that now is not the time to pull back our efforts. These numbers further illustrate the continued need to reject proposals for policy and/or practice that fail to take racial inequity into account. Differences in the socioeconomic circumstances of families surely impact educational outcomes, but socioeconomic differences fall far short of explaining persistent differences in the educational outcomes of Black and Latino male students. Race and gender do still matter.

You can access the Schott Foundation’s full report, The Urgency of Now, here.

Group Calls for Moratorium on Out-of-School Suspensions

SOLUTIONS NOT SUSPENSIONS, prostate a self-described “grassroots initiative of students, cialis educators, viagra parents, and community leaders, has called for a national moratorium on out-of-school suspensions. The group calls on states and districts to support teachers and schools in dealing with disciplinary infractions “in positive ways–keeping students in the classroom and helping educators work with students and parents to create safe and engaging classrooms that protect the human rights to education and dignity.” The group cites research showing that Black and Latino students and students with disabilities have been grossly disproportionately affected suspensions and expulsions; meaning disproportionate numbers of these students miss critical classroom instructional time,

I completely support this group’s efforts to replace out-of-school suspensions with positive alternatives. The disproportionate rates of suspension and expulsion for Black and Latino students, Black and Latino male students in particular, are nothing short of shameful. This group’s identification of the problem as a human rights issue is correct; this disproportionate treatment of Black and Latino children does in fact rise to the mark of being a human rights concern. Second, as an education concern, having disproportionate numbers of Black and Latino students unfairly kept out of their classrooms makes eliminating achievement gaps between them and white students and decreasing high school dropouts among these groups of students highly improbable.

But all hope is not lost. This is a problem that we can and we will address together; we must for the sake of our children.

For additional information on SOLUTIONS NOT SUSPENSION, please see: http://stopsuspensions.org/